UNCROCKERY @Trunk Gallery

with works by YOON Ju Dong

"The dishes should be made and dried well. When you put them in a kiln without drying, cracks or bursts can form. You can tell the degree of dryness by putting the bowl against your cheek. While still drying, the surface is cold with moisture. On the other hand, a good level of dryness will make your cheeks feel light and soft without any cold air. Pour the tea into the pot and hold it with both hands around the bowl [...] Along with the aesthetic componants, I make vessels that are able to be used when complete [...] If life is a person and a life, a vessel helps life.

During the reign of King Jeongjo of the Joseon Dynasty, Park Je-ga, a realist, once spoke about a bowl in his essay titled 북학의(北學議). He said, 'In general, it depends on how people keep things, not on the thickness and thiness of the bowl, or whether they are durable or not.' It's much better to continuously use an object carefully than to trust the strength of the dishes. Therefore, it is hard to see how many bowls have been broken by servants or during wedding ceremonies with large gatherings, or on days of ancestral rites in Korea. Why do we blame the bowl for breaking?

At first, the artisan made rough (earthenware)goods, and once the dishes were made rough, the people became accustomed to them and became rough themselves. Such a mentality spread from one side of the country to the other and formed a societal habit. The failure to make a single dish properly was imitated across the nation. This phenomenon cannot be overlooked by the neglect of a single object. We must warn the earthenware so that the vessels that do not conform to the law that they cannot be sold in the market.

So, it seems that everything starts with a bowl. I'm going to make one today and test it on my cheek."

-Yoon Joo Dong

Ju Dong YOON’s artwork is focussed on porcelain; the object is manifested in his artwork through various visual forms. In particular, Yoon draws inspiration from the white porcelain of Korea’s Joseon dynasty, such as ancestral offering trays and the Moon Jar. His work is, however, different from ordinary wares. Many of the pieces are off-center, crooked or unusable; the holes are shaped too strangely, the material is made from something other than porcelain. However, as he compliments the commonly seen wares with his uniquely shaped ones, they both offer us similar feelings of serenity, peace and calmness.

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Yoon Ju Dong
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