BACK TO THE PAINTING @KWANHOON GALLERY, SEOUL
with works by six New York artists, Matthew Hansel, Josh Reames, Lauren Silva, Michael Bevilacqua,
Wendy White, and Michael Scott

BACK TO THE PAINTING presents painterly canvas works by six artists from New York, Matthew Hansel, Josh Reames, Lauren Silva, Michael Bevilacqua, Wendy White, and Michael Scott elaborating a future perspective and analog sensibility.

 

Matt Hansel deconstructs the figurative historical painting, manipulating canvases to create a surreal and immersive visual experience. Layering imagery from classical painting with twisted cartoons and trompe l'oeil figures, Hansel’s work plays with visual absurdity and challenges perspective.

 

Josh Reames’s works deal with abstraction and painting in relation to the Internet, and are infused by online space where a majority of viewers would surf blogs and websites. His depth, dimension, and skills are typically lost in translation from object to imagery, leaving the information likely to be up on a digital monitor.

 

Lauren Silva's works were painted, printed and collaged and most importantly glitched. The glitch effect is now refers to the practiced skill of a positive phenomenon for new generation’s aesthetes. The digital images would impress slightly more if painted; the transient imagery of the Internet translated into a physical art, rather than borrowed from it. However, the paintings become intensely saturated half abstractions with much of their luminescence to the creative employ of silk rather than canvas by the artist.

 

Wendy White often creates mixed-media works, incorporating awnings, disused store front signage, manipulated photographs, and found objects, jeans into her acrylic and spray painted canvases to capture vigorous New York City. She describes her work as “a hybrid experience: painting and sculpture smashed together with buildings and streets, how it feels walking around a massive city, urban ghosts, forgotten architecture, new signs.”

 

Michael Scott works on large enamel-on-aluminum paintings whose stripes initially created visual effects with the illusion of multiple plains with a hypnotic and peaceful quality. Like On Kawara, Scott sees his work as performative, titling it a “meditative practice or performance” with a “very optical end result.” Working with tape and paint, Scott marks off sections of canvas before coating it with paint to effectively highlight positive and negative space, or absence and pause.

Showing all 26 results

Josh REAMES
Michael BEVILACQUA
Matthew HANSEL
Josh REAMES
Josh REAMES
Michael BEVILACQUA
Josh REAMES
Michael SCOTT
Michael SCOTT
Michael SCOTT
Michael SCOTT
Michael SCOTT
Michael SCOTT
Michael SCOTT
Michael SCOTT
Michael SCOTT
Michael SCOTT
Lauren SILVA
Josh REAMES
Lauren SILVA
Select your currency
USD United States dollar